Why Bad Weather Could be Good For Your Creativity

Being creative is one of the hardest parts with photography. Humans in general are really good at finding excuses not to do something, and photographers are no exception. Both you and me have used the bad weather as an excuse not to go out more than one time. If it’s raining or in general bad weather, I often use this as an excuse and stay inside working on pictures rather than going out taking them.

Why are we that afraid to go out just because the conditions are challenging? Isn’t part of the process being creative and thinking outside the box? What we tend to forget is the fact that challenging weather often creates some of the best images. 

Let’s try to use the conditions as a advantage rather than looking for excuses! Let’s try to think outside the box. 

On my recent road trip through the fjords West in Norway, the weather was really challenging, forcing me to seek other perspectives than I had planned. Low clouds, fog and rain made it tough to shoot at any of the famous overlooks along the fjords, but still I ended up with a few images I really like.

When the conditions are not ideal, you tend to be more selective with the photographs you take. Instead of snapping pictures like a maniac, you wait until you find something you really like.

Obviously this is how it should be all the time, but unfortunately that's not always the case. Bad weather might be exactly what you need to train your creativity. 

Let’s use my quick road trip throug West of Norway as an example. We only had two short days to travel before going to a wedding in Trondheim, so there was nothing I could do but work with the weather. Trollstigen was one of the highlights of the trip. I had never been here myself, and I was excited to show Mila one of Norways most iconic roads. We arrived early in the morning, beating the loads of tourists, but to our disappointment we were met with nothing but fog and low hanging clouds. We couldn’t see any sign of the road from the overlook. 

After spending some minutes being annoyed, we started driving down. Eventually we were out of the fog and we were gradually seeing more of the road in front of us. 

At this point I was actively scouting my surroundings for any possible photographs that could show the road or landscape from a different perspective. 

Down from the mountains we parked the car next to the road and I started hiking up the crystal blue river. After scrambling over some slippery rocks I found a composition that showed Trollstigen from a completely new perspective. 

Different view of the iconic trollstigen road

Different view of the iconic trollstigen road

Had it not been for the fog, I would most likely not have discovered this location. Sure,mi would have loved to get that classic shot too, but now I just have an excuse to go back!  

Thanks to the fog and clouds I was forced to think different on my entire trip, which resulted in me capturing a series of photos that are less common. I wasn't able to take a single shot of what I had previously planned, but I am really pleased with the results.

Keep this in mind the next time your are out photographing in bad weather; look for perspectives that enhances the mood. Use the weather to your advantage! 

Here is a collection of my moody shots from Western Norway: 

Distant waterfall somewhere in jotunheimen

Distant waterfall somewhere in jotunheimen

a cosy cabin close to trollstigen - Yes this is taken in late july!

a cosy cabin close to trollstigen - Yes this is taken in late july!

low clouds surrounding geirangerfjorden

low clouds surrounding geirangerfjorden

Foggy view from the famous geirangerfjorden overlook

Foggy view from the famous geirangerfjorden overlook